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School Bus Driver Files Federal Labor Charges Against Teamsters Union That Had Him Fired For Not Paying Union Dues

 
School Bus Driver Files Federal Labor Charges Against Teamsters Union That Had Him Fired For Not Paying Union Dues
 
 Foundation staff attorneys file charges with NLRB after union officials disregard Supreme Court protections for nonmember workers and carry out threat to have worker fired
 
 Fairbanks, AK (June 22, 2015) – National Right to Work Foundation staff attorneys filed federal unfair labor practice charges against Teamsters Local 959 on behalf of bus driver Scott Bracy who was illegally fired from his job for not paying forced dues and fees to the union. Charges were also filed against Bracy’s employer, First Student Management, LLC.

The charges, filed with the National Labor Relations Board, state that Teamsters union officials failed to follow U.S. Supreme Court-required procedures while demanding payment from Bracy, a dispute over which union officials eventually had First Student fire Bracy. The charges also state that Teamsters officials are seeking an illegal assessment.

As an employee of First Student, Bracy worked as a school bus driver in Fairbanks, Alaska. Teamsters Local 959 union officials have a monopoly bargaining contract with Bracy’s former employer. Because Alaska has not yet passed a state Right to Work law, workers can be forced to pay fees to a union as a condition of employment.

Nurse Wins NLRB Settlement Against Union for Illegal Policies Designed to Infringe on Right to Resign

 
 Nurse Wins NLRB Settlement Against Union for Illegal Policies Designed to Infringe on Right to Resign
 
NRTW Foundation staff attorneys asking NLRB to inform other nurses of settlement through union email system to avoid keeping them in the dark about their rights 
 
Olympia, WA (June 16, 2015) – The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) issued a unilateral settlement between United Food and Commercial Workers Local 21 (UFCW 21) and Sandra Dickson in response to unfair labor practice charges filed by National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation staff attorneys for Dickson.

Dickson worked as a registered nurse at Providence St. Peter Hospital. She was not a union member, but because Washington is a forced unionism state, Dickson was required as a condition of employment to fork over a portion of her paycheck to union bosses for so-called “agency fees.”

On December 29, 2014, charges were filed with the NLRB against UFCW 21 regarding an illegal “window period” restriction in the current collective bargaining contract and a requirement that workers provide their social security number in order to exercise their Beck rights to object to paying for activities unrelated to bargaining. “Window period” restrictions limit when union members can resign their membership, contrary to US Supreme Court precedent that union members have the right to resign their union membership at any time, for any reason. 

Nonunion Corrections Officers File Suit against Governor, Teamsters Union over Illegal Forced Dues

 
 Nonunion Corrections Officers File Suit against Governor, Teamsters Union over Illegal Forced Dues
 
Lawsuit challenges forced union dues for Washington State public employees and union failure to provide disclosures mandated by U.S. Supreme Court
 
Tacoma, WA (June 15, 2015) – With free legal assistance from National Right to Work Foundation staff attorneys and the Olympia-based Freedom Foundation, one retired and four current Washington State correctional officers have filed a lawsuit in U.S. District Court against Governor Jay Inslee, two high-ranking state Department of Corrections officials, and the Teamsters Local 117 union. The lawsuit challenges Teamster policies that discourage nonunion correctional officers from opting out of paying full union dues.

Gabriel Forest, Arthur Henderson, Joshua Lenss, and William McLaughlin are currently employed as correctional officers at the Stafford Creek Corrections Center. A fifth plaintiff, Michael Wageblast, retired from the State Department of Corrections in February 2015. All five plaintiffs have exercised their right to resign from the union. However, Teamsters Local 117 officials are empowered by state statute to collect dues and negotiate wages and working conditions for all employees within the plaintiffs’ bargaining unit, including nonmembers.

Teamsters Local 117 officials violated nonunion correctional officers’ rights by failing to provide them with adequate information about the union’s expenditures and sufficient opportunity to opt out of paying full union dues. Under the National Right to Work Foundation-won Hudson Supreme Court precedent, nonunion civil servants are entitled to information about union expenditures and a chance to refrain from paying union dues for anything unrelated to workplace bargaining, such as political activism.
 

School Bus Driver Wins Precedent: Michigan Public Employees Can Stop Paying Union Dues at Any Time

 
School Bus Driver Wins Precedent: Michigan Public Employees Can Stop Paying Union Dues at Any Time
 
MERC votes that Teamster union officials violated Right to Work law by requiring workers to wait for a “window period” to stop paying dues 
 
Howell, MI (June 10, 2015) – Yesterday, the Michigan Employee Relations Commission (MERC) unanimously decided to strike down a Teamster Local 214 policy that required Pauline Beutler and other employees to wait for a union-designated “window period” to stop paying union dues. Beutler, a school bus driver with the Livingston Education Service Agency, challenged the Teamsters’ policy with free legal assistance from National Right to Work Foundation staff attorneys.
Beutler filed charges with the MERC against the Teamsters in October 2013 after she attempted to leave the union and stop paying union dues. Instead of complying with Beutler's request, union officials told her that she would have to wait until July 2014 before she could revoke her dues deduction authorization and stop paying union dues. A dues deduction authorization is a document union officials use to collect dues or fees directly from workers' paychecks.
Beutler argued that Michigan's Right to Work law, which went into effect in March 2013, invalidates the union's window period requirement. Under the new law, employees have the right to resign their formal union membership and stop financially supporting a union at any time. 

Carpenters Union Officials Hit with Charges for Illegal Retaliation Against Workers Who Resigned Membership

 
 Carpenters Union Officials Hit with Charges for Illegal Retaliation Against Workers Who Resigned Membership
 
NLRB will investigate charges that union bullied workers who resigned from the union and took a nonunion job rather than remain out of work in the union 
 
Boone, IA (June 8, 2015) – Unfair labor practice charges have been filed with the National Labor Relations Board against the Chicago Regional Council of Carpenters and its Local 308 union. The charges were filed by workers, with free legal assistance from the National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation, who faced retaliation from union officials after they resigned their union membership.

The workers are carpenters and resigned their membership in Chicago Regional Council of Carpenters Local 308 on June 23, 2014. They then found employment with Lehman & Associates Concrete, Inc. in Boone, Iowa.

On August 1, 2014, the union filed internal discipline charges against the workers for finding work at Lehman and Associates, which is a union free workplace, despite the fact that workers who exercise their right to resign formal union membership can no longer be subjected to internal union discipline procedures. 

Federal Judge Certifies Class-Action Lawsuit Challenging Forced Fees for California Civil Servants

 
 
Federal Judge Certifies Class-Action Lawsuit Challenging Forced Fees for California Civil Servants
 
Lawsuit builds on Knox Supreme Court decision, seeks to require unions to obtain employees’ affirmative consent before collecting any money for political activities
 
 
Sacramento, CA (May 27, 2015) – The United States District Court for the Eastern District of California has just granted class-action status to a lawsuit filed by California civil servants against SEIU Local 1000. The lawsuit challenges the union’s collection policy, which requires nonmembers to affirmatively object to paying for union politics, and asks that the SEIU be required to get employees’ permission before spending their money on political activism. The plaintiffs are receiving free legal assistance from a National Right to Work Foundation staff attorney, who has been certified as the attorney for a class estimated to consist of at least 34,000 workers.

The lawsuit builds on Knox v. SEIU Local 1000, a Right to Work Foundation-won United States Supreme Court decision from 2012. In Knox, the High Court held, for the first time, that a union should not have collected dues for a political spending campaign without nonmembers’ affirmative consent.

In California and 24 other states that lack Right to Work laws, nonunion employees can be forced to pay union dues or fees to keep a job. However, employees have the right to opt out of paying for activities unrelated to workplace bargaining, such as union political activism.

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